Missouri school district required to learn about behavior assessments

MODESE recently required the Raytown School District to train special ed personnel to learn the difference between a functional behavioral assessment and a functional behavioral analysis. the-iep-center

The district had been at odds with a parent for some time over the difference between the two.

MODESE ruled that a functional behavioral assessment is an “evaluation” and that the district must respond to such a request from a parent.   This shows that public school personnel don’t always know proper procedures when working with a parent.  Delays in providing an evaluation for a child with significant behaviors  can be problematic.photoboybooks

Don’t be bamboozled!

Advocates at the IEP Center give parents the information to help them acquire the services a child needs.  We know the tactics schools use to bamboozle parents.

Parents who are serious about their child’s education all over Missouri use The IEP Center including North Kansas City School District, Fort Osage School District, Raymore-Peculiar School District and Liberty  School District.

To have an advocate contact you complete this form:

Sign up for The IEP Center Advocator ezine:  bit.ly/IEPezine

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not give advice; we give information about the problems of children with special needs. We do not represent anyone. Consult an attorney.

© Copyright Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC 2014

Your child is worth it; this is not a free service.

 

 

Parent suspicious of IEP student bruises, scrapes

Student who regularly exhibits inappropriate behaviors at the public school comes home unusual scrapes on his body. Parent is suspicious.  What to do? the-iep-center

In my experience, contacting the school personnel would be at the bottom of the list.  First, take pictures. Second, go to a medical professional and have them take pictures.  The medical professional may make a report to the state’s children’s agency.  Parent’s can also make reports to the state children’s protective agency (do a search for “child abuse hotline” .  If warranted, contact law enforcement.  Sometimes local police departments don’t view the situation seriously so consider county law enforcement.

Not sure?  Missouri’s School Violence Hotline (1-866-748-7047)can document your call but that’s usually the extent of their effectiveness; at least the parent made a report.

Taking steps to prevent future harm to your child is key.  Many times schools have not implemented professionally-developed behavior plans for our kids who have significant behaviors. NICHCYphotoWorried

Don’t be bamboozled!   Parents who are serious about their child’s schooling and tired of being bamboozled use advocates at The IEP Center. We go with parents to IEP meetings.

To have an advocate contact you complete this form:

Sign up for The IEP Center Advocator ezine:  bit.ly/IEPezine

Visit the IEP Center website  (opens new page)

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not give advice; we give information about the problems of children with special needs. We do not represent anyone. Consult an attorney.

© Copyright Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC 2014

We provide low-cost support for parents.

Homebound placement not working for IEP student

A school district took months to arrange for “homebound”rsz_wheretonow-201x300 schooling to start.  The district’s given reason to the parent was they couldn’t get an existing staffer to perform the homebound teaching.  Parents was at wit’s end and the situation took it’s toll on the family both financially and emotionally.  Parent waited patiently for the homebound to start happening and before parent realized, months had passed.  Are our kids’ with special needs not a priority?  Perhaps the school could have offered an alternative service in the interim?  Maybe a tutor?  Would you consider this a “forced dropout” situation?

Don’t be bamboozled!   Parents who are serious about their child’s schooling and tired of being bamboozled use advocates at The IEP Center. We go with parents to IEP meetings.the-iep-center

To have an advocate contact you complete this form:

Sign up for The IEP Center Advocator ezine:  bit.ly/IEPezine

Visit the IEP Center website  (opens new page)

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not give advice; we give information about the problems of children with special needs. We do not represent anyone. Consult an attorney.

© Copyright Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC 2014

Senior Year IEP meeting in Missouri; special education graduation

IEP students in Missouri can continue to receive services from the school district up rsz_teen-readingthrough age 21 if the student has not “graduated” or met credits necessary for graduation; the guardian or 18year-old-student must make it known well before graduation that this is their intent; usually done in writing.  These services do not necessarily have to be in the traditional classroom setting at the local high school building. Some students use neighboring school districts’ programs or community programs.  “Transition” programs can be broad.

Acquiring a “diploma” versus acquiring a “certificate of completion”  may make a difference on how a parent and student want their high school years to look.

Here’s a link to explore ideas to prepare for life after high school known as “transition:   (link opens new page)

http://www.pacer.org/tatra/resources/ada.asp

When a student turns 18, he makes educational decisions in IEP meetings unless a court has appointed a guardian for him  for educational decision-making.  An 18-year-old student can inform the IEP team of his decision to not officially graduate so he can continue to receive services from the school.  He can indicate he wants to participate in graduation ceremonies but not yet “officially” graduate.

This can be complex.  Need more info?  Contact The IEP Center below:

 

Sign up for The IEP Center Advocator ezine:  bit.ly/IEPezine

Visit the IEP Center website  (opens new page)

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not give advice; we give information about the problems of children with special needs. We do not represent anyone. Consult an attorney.

We offer information and individualized services at low-cost. We help parents prepare for school meetings and IDEA mediation.

© 2018 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center ™