“As needed” on IEP accommodation form no longer acceptable

Schools for decades used “as needed” on our kids’ IEP modification forms which allowed school staff to use discretion on if/when an accommodation is provided.  MODESE recently saw the light and has now determined “as needed” without descriptors is no longer acceptable. rsz_wheretonow-201x300

The Oct. 17, 2014, update from MODESE Special Ed compliance section:

Indicator 200.850.d (Frequency of Program Modifications and Accommodations):  Indicator 200.850.d requires the IEP to state how often program modifications and accommodation will occur (i.e. -, daily, weekly, monthly).  The frequency of “as needed” was removed as an option on the model Form F because it is not a clear description of the frequency.  If an IEP team determines that an accommodation or modification is to be provided “as needed,” then we would expect a description of how “as needed” will be determined.  The IEP must be clear to parents and LEA staff so that it can be implemented as written.

This new requirement may make a huge difference in how our kid’s day at school plays out.

Advocates at The IEP Center help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs.  Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney.

We help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to mediation and IEP meetings with parents.

 

©2014 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC

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IEP student suspended more than ten days; special education suspension Missouri

Our kids with IEPs get suspended from public school. Unlike non-disabled students, a special process is in place for kids with IEPs.  In most states, students with IEPs can be suspended up to ten school days in a school year.  After ten days of suspensions, a different process is suppose to kick in other than what applies to “regular” education students.

Some school districts ignore this and continue suspending/expelling special ed students as if they were typical students. A parent must be ready to address this with the public school; if not, the problem compounds.  Suspensions often take a toll on the family; sometimes resulting in a  parent losing a job!

The IEP Center.com ™ advocates helps parents deal with the public school for our kids with learning disabilities, autism, aspergers, cognitive deficits, cerebral palsy.  Advocates are available with extensive experience helping parents deal with public schools.  Get serious about your child’s schooling.  Schools may bamboozle parents because they have and continue until the parent takes a stand.

Often it is the parents who set the tone of their relationship with the public school while the child is young.  Parents who are assertive and ask questions are the students who are less chance to let slip through the cracks by the school.  Parents who present themselves as not interested, or who don’t ask questions are misunderstood and unknowingly, more easily trampled.

Parents in Missouri or Kansas who need help dealing with the public school for their child with an IEP can consult with a professional special education advocate at The IEP Center™.   Advocates also help parents when the parent wants an advocate to go to a meeting at the school.

Parents often need to work to make sure the public school system isn’t failing their child.  Passing grades doesn’t necessarily mean your child is learning.rsz_diversityboyinclasslookingatbook  Delays in addressing school problems may make the situation worse.

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice. We do not represent parents or children.  Consult an attorney.

We help parents at low-cost.  Delay works against our kids.

©2014 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™

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