who to take to an IEP meeting in Missouri

Parents can invite people to attend the child’s IEP meeting.  We know of no regulation that requires parents  to inform the public school whom the parent brings.

If the public school district in Missouri is uncooperative, conrsz_lawwomanwithcoupleinbackgroundtact the civil rights advocates at The IEPCenter.com™  We are available to go to IEP meetings when invited by the parent, in Missouri and Kansas*.

The more information a parent has before entering an IEP meeting, the better they can make informed decisions.  A parent’s failure to ask the right questions in an IEP meeting may result in the child getting “left behind”.

One of the most overlooked people to invite is the paraprofessional(s) who work with the child.  Parents can notify the special ed administrator in advance that the parent is inviting the para.  Often the para is the person at the school who knows the child the best.

Some districts disallow paras to go to IEP meetings; contact our advocate to learn strategies to overcome this obstacle.

Districts’ sometimes place a heavy burden on paras, especially when the para has no skills related to the disability.  Paras usually go through a “training”, however it is often unrelated to our child’s special need(s). Often paras never see the IEP document.

Many times the para is not a good match for a student and problems arise.  Parents can find ways to privately talk to a para about what’s going on at school.

the-iep-center

In Missouri call 816 865 6262

The more information a parent has before entering an IEP meeting, the better they can make informed decisions.  A parent’s failure to ask the right questions in an IEP meeting may result in the child getting “left behind”.

 

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©2018 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ are  civil rights advocates. Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC advocates have special knowledge related to the problems of children with disabilities. We are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not represent parents or children.  We are not licensed to practice law in any state. Consult an attorney.  Nothing in this blog is to be considered legal advice.

We offer low-cost advocate (non-attorney) services.

*arrangements must be made in advance

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