Half-day is unexpected for IEP student in Missouri High School

Last school year the high school had a wonderful half-day program to help students prepare for life after high school (transition). Vocal parents of the children who just graduated made sure the program existed.

This year the program no longer exists.  Students are encouraged to be dismissed after the regular half-day.  Hmmm. rsz_teen-reading

Parents need to be aware how many minutes of service(s) is listed on the IEP and make sure it is a full day if that is what the student expects/needs.

Advocates at The IEP Center help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs.  Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.the-iep-center (800x640)

Never go alone to an IEP meeting; our advocates are available!

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney.

We help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to mediation and IEP meetings with parents.

©2015 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center

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Homeschooling suggested by Missouri public school Asperger Autism

I helped a parent once who learned there was no “program” for her son; she went on to work the “system” and ultimately they developed an early childhood program for the first time for the children in that district!

Public schools sometimes aren’t eager to serve our kids with special needs. rsz_supplementary1-300x199 Sometimes parents are misled to think they have to follow the school’s decision when the school’s actions are not consistent with state regulations. For example, a student was being sent home regularly on a school bus after third hour each day since “there’s no afternoon program this year“.  Some parents have been told the district doesn’t have a program for the child, then suggest “homeschooling” is an option.  Many states consider “homeschool” as private school, thus the child loses his/her position in the public school system.

This can be considered by some as a “forced dropout“.  This is discrimination in my opinion. Congress has avenues in place for us (or anyone in the “public”) when discrimination happens.  We parents have more leverage with the school than we often realize.  Our mediation specialist can share how quickly issues can be resolved once mediation is requested; mediation is one of the most effective dispute resolution processes!

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Advocates at The IEP Center help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs.  Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay the problem.

Never go alone to an IEP meeting; our advocates are available!  816 865 6262

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We help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to mediation and IEP meetings with parents.
Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney.

 

©2015 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center

Students get extra help from para (paraprofessional) at the public school

So you’ve been told that your child has a paraprofessional to help him while at school.  Sometimes these support people are called classroom aide, teacher’s aide, etc. What does this mean?
It may mean that the paraprofessional is also helping many other students in addition to your child. It may mean that your child gets help from a paraprofessional during certain portions of the school day. Don’t assume it is a one-on-one scenario. Some schools have wording in the IEP “student will have adult supervision”; I would hope so!  All public school children have “adult supervision”.

To what extent are your child’s needs met (or not) with or without a para?  Don’t assume that the teacher alone can meet all your child’s needs and all the other students’ in the room (in an IEP meeting, teachers won’t ask for extra staff in the room but parents can request para supports!)  Schools are now explaining that budget cuts result in less staff; your child who previously had a para may not now–unless you ask you may not know!  Our advocates can go to school meetings with parents. rsz_enthusiasticlearner-300x199

Ask the school:

  • how many students are served by the para?
  • at what times/scenarios does the para work/assist my child?
  • what real-life experience does my para have working with a student who has the disability my child has?
  • what training specific to the disability has the para attended?  if none, why not?
  • what training does my para receive that is different than   the professional teachers receive?  what does the para know about my child’s disability?
  • who will substitute for the para when the para is absent? how available is the sub?
  • what training/experience does the sub have?

Perhaps your child has a paraprofessional assigned to him and you are concerned that the para may provide too much or not enough support to your child.  Ask the school:

  • In what subjects/activities does the para provide direct instruction?
  • In what subjects/activities does the para provide social guidance/set or guide interaction with peers?
  • In what settings does the para fade to the background and serve only as a monitor?
  • In what settings does the para provide physical/hands-on support/assistance?
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These questions are best asked of the para privately and later to the staff in an IEP or 504 meeting.  A parent can request that these details be included in the IEP under supplemental aids/services.  In a 504 plan, it can be listed as accommodations.

The para may need ways to make his life simpler at the school.  Ask the para if he needs access to closets/storage areas at various points in the building for ease in acquiring extra clothing or a private area to change the student’s clothing.  Offer to provide extra clothing in an additional backpack close to the lunch area in case of spills. Don’t forget the para on the bus; she may need items as well.

When discussing your child’s needs at the school, be careful of the terms you use.  Yes, we all want our children to be “independent”; however, school personnel may interpret “independent” to mean that the student should be left to his own vices as much as possible—resulting in limited assistance from the para.  In primary settings, this may not be the desired scenario for some children. A standard Missouri had for our kids back in the early 90’s was “maximize the capabilities”.

If your child has been assigned a paraprofessional (para), more questions need to be asked!  A proactive parents helps prevent a child from incidents that result in suspensions or change in placement(s).

Accolades to all the hard-working wonderful paras!  Thank you.

Don’t be bamboozled by the school!  Our advocates inform parents about what Congress has for parents to help your child. We also go to those confusing IEP meetings!  Visit our website to set a phone consult;  theiepcenter.com

©2015 , 2017   Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™.  We are civil rights advocates.

We provide information at low-cost to parents so they can better advocate for their child with disabilities in the public school.  We can go with parents to meetings at the school.

Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We are not licensed to practice law in any state; we do not represent parents or children.  Consult an attorney.

Parent asks school to please test my kid

Girl struggled continuously in first grade with reading and math; teacher told mom the student may outgrow the struggles.  Mom asked the school how the school might help.  Girl is now in third grade and cries at school during math.NICHCYphotomagnifyglass3-198x300  The parent spends long evenings doing homework with girl beyond what is reasonable for a third grade student.  After several inquiries by parent, the public school teacher tells the parent it’s now time to test her but teacher doesn’t think she’ll be eligible for special education.

I get calls like this all too often! Parents aren’t aware how to get the “system” to help their child, and the school isn’t telling the parent!  Don’t let the years slip by!

Contact an advocate here:

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Our advocates can provide information to you over the phone so you have more information to work “the system” at the public school.  Set an appointment on our website.  We can go to school meetings with you.

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Advocates at Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not represent anyone.  Consult an attorney.

Copyright 2014 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center