student sent home since no behavior program at public school Missouri

100_0691Student with behaviors that the public school doesn’t appropriately address is sent home. The parent has no idea that the school has a duty to provide programming for this student to the same extent that typical student benefit from schooling (such as a full day). In some instances the public school completes paperwork called “homebound“.

Public school staff often don’t understand the importance of proactively implementing positive behavior supports.   Advocates at TheIEPCenter.com™ help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs.    Schools often don’t put plans into place legitimately unless a parent pursues action.  Educational “systems” move slowly.  It’s what a parent doesn’t know that can deprive children of needed services.

Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.  Waiting too long to address concerns eliminates opportunities for correction.

We help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to school meetings with parents.

Contact an advocate here:

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center provide information to parents regarding the problems of children with special needs. We are civil rights advocates.

This website is for information only.  We do not give legal advice.  We do not represent anyone. Consult an attorney.

©2016 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC

 

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Cameras needed in MO Special Education Classrooms? 2016

Feb. 2016

Missouri’s House Bill 2419 would require cameras into public school classrooms where special education students attend.

Texas did this last year.SnipHB2419GIF

Let’s look at pros and cons.

Pros:

  1. Non-verbal students parent’s could better understand how a student acquired an injury
  2. Teachers and staff in the room wouldn’t be accused of hurting a student when the student’s injury was self-inflicted or caused by another student.
  3. Staff concerns voiced to administration over students who need more supports will be legitimized.
  4. Attacks by students onto other students will be recorded.
  5. Promotes the access to a safer environment for those who are the most vulnerable.
  6. Decreases potential liability of school district.
  7. Students and staff  would be less likely to be maltreated and bullied.

Cons:

  1. Costs to purchase and install.  I would hope local community groups and PTAs would consider contributing these to our local schools.  Perhaps DESE would implement a grant program. Perhaps donations by technology organizations.
  2. Maintenance.  Many districts currently maintain cameras operating on campus.

The bill may be viewed at:  http://www.house.mo.gov/billtracking/bills161/billpdf/intro/HB2419I.PDF

The status of the bill:  http://www.house.mo.gov/BillActions.aspx?bill=HB2419&year=2016&code=R

Locate your state representative telephone number here:  http://house.mo.gov/legislatorlookup.aspx

Student in IEP meeting? Missouri Kansas

Often meetings at the school to develop educational plans for special needs’ students involve discussions that may be hurtful for the child.   Not knowing that this may occur, a student in the meeting can make for an awkward position for the child.rsz_meeting7

Students who do not have the capacity to advocate for themselves may feel emotionally beaten. Other students may not understand the power dynamic in these meetings and withdraw. The adults in the room may use the opportunity to “motivate” the child to “work harder” or “apply yourself”.  Examine the motivation of a school that insists a student be present in multiple school meetings; if it’s just a control or power issue, it’s okay to say that the student wasn’t invited. There are a few exceptions to when a student must be present (planning for life after high school (aka “transition”), if the student is already age 18, etc.

It is a risky scenario to have a child in IEP or 504 meetings. Advocates at The IEP Center™ know strategies parents can use to avoid these scenarios. Contact us for more information.

In lieu of the student present in the school meeting, a parent could observe the classroom prior to the meeting.AngelsenseRunnerJPEG

Advocates at The IEP Center™ help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs.  Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.the-iep-center (800x640)

Never go alone to an IEP meeting; our advocates are available!

sign up for ezine:  bit.ly/IEPezine

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Contact an advocate below:

Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  We do not represent parents or children.  Consult an attorney.

We help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to mediation and IEP meetings with parents.  Go to our website to set a telephone consult.

©2015 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™

IEP meeting: Okay to not agree in Missouri IEP meeting

IEP meetings can be frustrating; for both parents and teachers.  However, the information acquired from school staff can be quite helpful to the parent. Parents can ask about the specifics of a child’s schedule and staffing.  Parents can ask about the social dynamics of classes their child participates in.rsz_nclb2girlslookingateachother

One of the most important questions to ask is who has expertise in the child’s specific disability?  Does the district have such expert on staff?  Availability of that staff to work with my child?  Schools that have “programs” based on disability sometimes need to be reminded that the IEP meeting is not about a “program”, but rather about “individualizing” a child’s plan.  If you don’t agree with what is being offered, a parent can say so…and ask for more options.

Advocates at The IEP Center™ help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs.  Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.  If you’ve had an IEP meeting and issues weren’t resolved, you need an advocate on your side! the-iep-center (800x640)

Never go alone to an IEP meeting; our advocates are available!

sign up for ezine:  bit.ly/IEPezine

facebook

Contact an advocate below:

Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities.  We are civil rights advocates for parents of children with disabilities.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney.  We do not have a license to practice law.

We help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to mediation and IEP meetings with parents.

©2015 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™