IEP school help for Missouri parents

Schools often don’t put  legitimate, appropriate programming in place unless a parent pursues action. Many parents are contacting us to share 100_0673accounts of student’s who now  attend in a new building but the positive behavior strategies mistakenly aren’t implemented  from the previous year, although though the IEP continues in effect.

Public school staff often don’t understand the importance of proactively implementing behavior plans and accommodations.  Many students with ADD or ADHD need time for extra movement; or to do their desk work while standing.  Advocates at TheIEPCenter.com™ help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so the parent can advocate for the child with special needs. Schools often don’t put plans into place legitimately unless a parent pursues action.  Educational “systems” move slowly.  It’s what a parent doesn’t know that can deprive children of needed services.  We go to IEP meetings with parents.

Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.  Waiting too long to address concerns eliminates opportunities for correction.

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Contact an advocate here:

 

Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ helps parents at low-cost.  SEPAL provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities. We are civil rights advocates.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney.

We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to school meetings with parents*.  816 865 6262

©2018 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™

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*prior arrangements necessary

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Parent requests “blown off” in IEP meeting Missouri

In a March IEP meeting, the parent asked IEP team to re-evaluate the student; the   administrator present tells the parent the school will do the reevaluation in the fall since it’s so close to the end of the school year (teachers who were present 100_0668did not comment).  Also, parent asked for more time in therapy to develop language/speech skills; parent was told that would not be possible since the schedule of the school would not have time.

These delays and refusals are typical and parents should expect the district to provide a documented response from the school.

It’s what a parent doesn’t know that can deprive children of needed services.  We go to  school meetings with parents.

Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.  Waiting too long to address concerns eliminates opportunities for correction.  Parents can have more control than they often realize!

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Set a consult now!    bit.ly/iepconsult

Consults are with a former Missouri due process hearing panel member, parent, certified teacher, negotiator in IDEA mediation sessions, civil rights advocate for over 20 years.

We help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to school meetings with parents.

Contact an advocate here:

Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities. We are civil rights advocates.   We are not attorneys and do not give advice. We are not licensed to practice law in any state. We do not represent anyone.  Consult an attorney.

©2017 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™

IEP school help for Missouri parents

Schools often don’t put plans into place legitimately unless a parent pursues action. Many parents are contacting us to share 100_0673accounts of student’s who now  attend in a new building but the positive behavior strategies mistakenly aren’t implemented  from the previous year, although though the IEP continues in effect.

Public school staff often don’t understand the importance of proactively implementing behavior plans and accommodations.  Many students with ADD or ADHD need time for extra movement; or to do their desk work while standing.  Advocates at TheIEPCenter.com™ help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so the parent can advocate for the child with special needs. Schools often don’t put plans into place legitimately unless a parent pursues action.  Educational “systems” move slowly.  It’s what a parent doesn’t know that can deprive children of needed services.  We go to IEP meetings with parents.

Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.  Waiting too long to address concerns eliminates opportunities for correction.

sign up for newsletter:  bit.ly/IEPezine       facebook

Contact an advocate here:

Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ helps parents at low-cost.  SEPAL provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities. We are civil rights advocates.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney.

We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to school meetings with parents*.  816 865 6262

©2018 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™

AngelsenseRunnerJPEG

*prior arrangements necessary

Students get extra help from para (paraprofessional) at the public school

So you’ve been told that your child has a paraprofessional to help him while at school.  Sometimes these support people are called classroom aide, teacher’s aide, etc. What does this mean?
It may mean that the paraprofessional is also helping many other students in addition to your child. It may mean that your child gets help from a paraprofessional during certain portions of the school day. Don’t assume it is a one-on-one scenario. Some schools have wording in the IEP “student will have adult supervision”; I would hope so!  All public school children have “adult supervision”.

To what extent are your child’s needs met (or not) with or without a para?  Don’t assume that the teacher alone can meet all your child’s needs and all the other students’ in the room (in an IEP meeting, teachers won’t ask for extra staff in the room but parents can request para supports!)  Schools are now explaining that budget cuts result in less staff; your child who previously had a para may not now–unless you ask you may not know!  Our advocates can go to school meetings with parents. rsz_enthusiasticlearner-300x199

Ask the school:

  • how many students are served by the para?
  • at what times/scenarios does the para work/assist my child?
  • what real-life experience does my para have working with a student who has the disability my child has?
  • what training specific to the disability has the para attended?  if none, why not?
  • what training does my para receive that is different than   the professional teachers receive?  what does the para know about my child’s disability?
  • who will substitute for the para when the para is absent? how available is the sub?
  • what training/experience does the sub have?

Perhaps your child has a paraprofessional assigned to him and you are concerned that the para may provide too much or not enough support to your child.  Ask the school:

  • In what subjects/activities does the para provide direct instruction?
  • In what subjects/activities does the para provide social guidance/set or guide interaction with peers?
  • In what settings does the para fade to the background and serve only as a monitor?
  • In what settings does the para provide physical/hands-on support/assistance?
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These questions are best asked of the para privately and later to the staff in an IEP or 504 meeting.  A parent can request that these details be included in the IEP under supplemental aids/services.  In a 504 plan, it can be listed as accommodations.

The para may need ways to make his life simpler at the school.  Ask the para if he needs access to closets/storage areas at various points in the building for ease in acquiring extra clothing or a private area to change the student’s clothing.  Offer to provide extra clothing in an additional backpack close to the lunch area in case of spills. Don’t forget the para on the bus; she may need items as well.

When discussing your child’s needs at the school, be careful of the terms you use.  Yes, we all want our children to be “independent”; however, school personnel may interpret “independent” to mean that the student should be left to his own vices as much as possible—resulting in limited assistance from the para.  In primary settings, this may not be the desired scenario for some children. A standard Missouri had for our kids back in the early 90’s was “maximize the capabilities”.

If your child has been assigned a paraprofessional (para), more questions need to be asked!  A proactive parents helps prevent a child from incidents that result in suspensions or change in placement(s).

Accolades to all the hard-working wonderful paras!  Thank you.

Don’t be bamboozled by the school!  Our advocates inform parents about what Congress has for parents to help your child. We also go to those confusing IEP meetings!  Visit our website to set a phone consult;  theiepcenter.com

©2015 , 2017   Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™.  We are civil rights advocates.

We provide information at low-cost to parents so they can better advocate for their child with disabilities in the public school.  We can go with parents to meetings at the school.

Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We are not licensed to practice law in any state; we do not represent parents or children.  Consult an attorney.