Missouri IEP meetings where parents hear double-talk

Parents now report school staff ask parents intimidating questions to redirect parents away from the topic of services that our children need. “Don’t you want your child to be independent?” is a common question parents are asked.

Within the last four years I have noticed the supports (paraprofessionals) that were a given for many students with inappropriate behaviors are no longer mentioned to parents. These districts are placing the overwhelming task on a classroom teacher of up to 30 students.  Unrealistic to all!rsz_asianteenmale-vert-199x300

Uninformed and inexperienced parents don’t realize their child is missing basic support services while at public school. This results in suspensions that are unnecessary and could usually be avoided.

Advocates at the IEP Center™ help parents with these civil rights’ concerns in public schools.

Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ advocates are not attorneys and do not give legal advice.  We do not represent children or parents.  Contact an attorney.

Need help quick?  816 865 6262   set a phone consult:   bit.ly/iepconsult

©2016 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC

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Cameras needed in MO Special Education Classrooms? 2016

Feb. 2016

Missouri’s House Bill 2419 would require cameras into public school classrooms where special education students attend.

Texas did this last year.SnipHB2419GIF

Let’s look at pros and cons.

Pros:

  1. Non-verbal students parent’s could better understand how a student acquired an injury
  2. Teachers and staff in the room wouldn’t be accused of hurting a student when the student’s injury was self-inflicted or caused by another student.
  3. Staff concerns voiced to administration over students who need more supports will be legitimized.
  4. Attacks by students onto other students will be recorded.
  5. Promotes the access to a safer environment for those who are the most vulnerable.
  6. Decreases potential liability of school district.
  7. Students and staff  would be less likely to be maltreated and bullied.

Cons:

  1. Costs to purchase and install.  I would hope local community groups and PTAs would consider contributing these to our local schools.  Perhaps DESE would implement a grant program. Perhaps donations by technology organizations.
  2. Maintenance.  Many districts currently maintain cameras operating on campus.

The bill may be viewed at:  http://www.house.mo.gov/billtracking/bills161/billpdf/intro/HB2419I.PDF

The status of the bill:  http://www.house.mo.gov/BillActions.aspx?bill=HB2419&year=2016&code=R

Locate your state representative telephone number here:  http://house.mo.gov/legislatorlookup.aspx

ADHD student IEP goals not helpful Missouri

Student with IEP goals of “turning in work on time” and reduced need for “redirection” has had same goals for years.  The goals have no indication of the baseline for the student, nor what specifics will make his success happen.rsz_parapro2-199x300

The IEP lists some accommodations but lacks the modifications necessary to help this student progress.  Student hates school and often “tunes out”.  Many school districts do not offer extra adult help in classrooms; many paraprofessionals were eliminated a couple of years ago.  Parents can request that paraprofessionals be available and specifically assigned to the student for a certain number of minutes per week.

Public school staff often don’t understand the importance of proactively implementing modifications.  Many students with ADD or ADHD need recesses and time for extra movement; or to do their desk work while standing.  Advocates at TheIEPCenter.com™ help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs. Schools often don’t put plans into place legitimately unless a parent pursues action.  Educational “systems” move slowly.  It’s what a parent doesn’t know that can deprive children of needed services.

Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.  Waiting too long to address concerns eliminates opportunities for correction.

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney. We are not licensed to practice law in any state. We do not represent anyone.

We are civil rights advocates who help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to school meetings with parents.

©2016 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center

Care team watching my child struggle in public school in Missouri

rsz_writingstudent-vert-201x300tchronchalkboardPublic schools sometimes aren’t eager to serve our kids with special needs.  Sometimes parents are misled to think they have to follow the school’s decision when the school’s actions are not consistent with state regulations. For example, a student who struggled academically was  being monitored by school personnel called a “care team”. Some parents have been told the district doesn’t have a program for your child, then continuing to be monitored by this “care team” for over two years.

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Advocates at The IEP Center™ help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs.  Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay the problem.

Never go alone to an IEP meeting; our advocates are available!  816 865 6262

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Contact an advocate below:

Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney.

©2015 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™