Fixing IEP problems at public school in Missouri?

Let’s examine what parents do to fix IEP problems. But is that really the issue that needs addressed? Perhaps it’s something more.

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Parents can have more control

Hypothetically, let’s say a child had needs/goals that went unaddressed or misaddressed for an entire school year, and as a result, the child now struggles more and has significantly regressed because of the public school’s failures.

Parents commonly pursue resolving this dilemma by:

  1. request another IEP meeting
  2. have meetings (not IEP meetings) with administrators
  3. call or take a friend to help
  4. call a case manager from a different system to go to a meeting

Did any of these help the child recover from the regression?

Other parents commonly pursue resolving this dilemma in these ways:

  1. contact a non-profit agency who trains parents
  2. contact a non-profit whose staffer or volunteer goes to an IEP meeting (sometimes waiting weeks to process into a system)

Did any of these help the child recover from the regression?

Congress has avenues in place for parents to pursue correction and regression.  There are ways to press a public school to be accountable, and perhaps offer to make up for the losses.

Don’t be bamboozled!  Begging in an IEP meeting often does not gain any ground…Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.  Waiting too long to address concerns eliminates opportunities for correction.  Time is your enemy.

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities. We are civil rights advocates.   We are not attorneys and do not give advice. We are not licensed to practice law in any state. We do not represent anyone.  Consult an attorney.

©2017 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™

We help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to school meetings with parents.

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ADHD student IEP goals not helpful Missouri

Student with IEP goals of “turning in work on time” and reduced need for “redirection” has had same goals for years.  The goals have no indication of the baseline for the student, nor what specifics will make his success happen.rsz_parapro2-199x300

The IEP lists some accommodations but lacks the modifications necessary to help this student progress.  Student hates school and often “tunes out”.  Many school districts do not offer extra adult help in classrooms; many paraprofessionals were eliminated a couple of years ago.  Parents can request that paraprofessionals be available and specifically assigned to the student for a certain number of minutes per week.

Public school staff often don’t understand the importance of proactively implementing modifications.  Many students with ADD or ADHD need recesses and time for extra movement; or to do their desk work while standing.  Advocates at TheIEPCenter.com™ help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs. Schools often don’t put plans into place legitimately unless a parent pursues action.  Educational “systems” move slowly.  It’s what a parent doesn’t know that can deprive children of needed services.

Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.  Waiting too long to address concerns eliminates opportunities for correction.

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney. We are not licensed to practice law in any state. We do not represent anyone.

We are civil rights advocates who help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to school meetings with parents.

©2016 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center

Before special education “due process” in Missouri considerations

Some parents believe the only way to get a public school to correct it’s errors with our children who have IEPs is to file for “due process”.rsz_steps1-200x300

In a very small number of instances that is true.  However, in most instances there are several other less cumbersome avenues to consider.

Parents aren’t aware most of the public school district’s in Missouri have an insurance policy in place that provides them with legal representation AGAINST THE PARENT when a parent files “due process”.  So the parent on a limited-income is already in a “David vs. Goliath” scenario.  Is this why school district’s don’t hesitate to encourage a parent to request “due process”?

Due process is often costly, lengthy, stressful and slow (compared to other processes).

Advocates at The IEP Center can help a parent with other avenues to pursue when the public school needs to correct problems our child experiences. the-iep-center

Sign up for the ezine The IEP Center Advocator

Visit our website to arrange for an advocate to assist.  Marilyn McClure, CRP, is a certified teacher, parent of a child with developmental disabilities, and former due process hearing panel member in Missouri.

Advocates at The IEP Center are not attorneys and do not give legal advice. Consult an attorney.  We do not represent anyone.

©2015 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center

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Beware of homebound offer for an IEP student

Some students who are eligible for special education services and have IEPs have behaviors that may be considered by some as violent.  These students are often a challenge for a school district to provide the appropriate program.

A parent may be told the student is so violent that the school district cannot educate the student and homebound is mentioned.  Left out of this conversation could be that the school needs to find a program that is rsz_dropoutdictionaryappropriate for this child and place and transport the child there.  Many outside programs exist for students with extreme needs.

Such “Outside placement” can be costly for the school district.  Perhaps that’s why it isn’t mentioned to parents?

More school districts continue to mention homebound as a way to force the parent to “take it or leave it” when the district wants the student to fit into their system and not provide accommodations/modifications.  Uninformed parents get trampled; some lose jobs and marriages over this scenario.  After all, homebound is often provided at public libraries for only a few hours each week–nothing compared to a full school week.

Advocates at The IEP Center ™ help parents solve IEP problems by providing information so they can advocate for the child with special needs.  Don’t be bamboozled!  Waiting and hoping for problems to go away allows our children to regress.  Hoping the problem will go away will only delay getting the problem addressed.the-iep-center (800x640)

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Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™ provides information to parents regarding the problems of children with disabilities.  We are not attorneys and do not give advice.  Consult an attorney.

We help parents at low-cost.  We help parents prepare for school meetings and also go to mediation and IEP meetings with parents.

Contact an advocate below:

©2014 Special Education Parent’s Advocacy Link LLC dba The IEP Center™